Flying with Emotional Support Animals

Under federal law you are entitled to travel with your Emotional Support Animal, however each airline has different policies on ESA letters and they change frequently. If you plan to travel with your ESA you should first call the airline and inform them and ask about any special requirements. You are required to submit your travel plans and documents to the airline at least 24 hours in advance, however some airlines request 48 hour notice. If you are an existing client and need a custom letter or special form please make the request by emailing client support. If you are a first time client, please continue to the order form to order an evaluation with one of our licensed therapists and be sure to request the specific airline form you need during checkout.

As of April 2019, Many airlines are now requiring a veterinary health form for your ESA as well as your confirmation the animal is properly trained for commercial air travel. Please view our overview of airline ESA travel policies, but always remember to view each updated policy by either calling airline directly or visiting their website prior to each flight.

Flying Somewhere? Order Your Forms Here

Airline Letter Evaluation

Plans starting at $ 129 .00

Airline Letter & Forms

Plans starting at $ 179 .00

Click on Each Airline to see their Specific ESA Policy

Delta
Delta

Form Required, One ESA Per Passenger, No Pit-bulls, ESA. must be 4 months or older

Phone: 1-800-455-2720
American Airlines
American Airlines

Form Required, One ESA per passenger, ESA must be 4 months or older.

Phone: 1-800-433-7300
Hawaiian Airlines
Hawaiian Airlines

Form Required, One ESA Per Passenger, Health Certificate Required

Phone: 1-877-426-4537
Alaska
Alaska

Form Required, One ESA per passenger, Must be Cat or Dog

Phone: 1-800-426-0333
Allegiant
Allegiant

Form Required, No Pit-bulls Allowed, One ESA per passenger

Phone: 1-702-505-8888
Frontier Airlines
Frontier Airlines

Form Required, One ESA per passenger, Must be Cat or Dog

Phone: 1-877-426-4537
JetBlue
JetBlue

Form Required, One ESA per passenger, Must be Cat or Dog

Phone: 1-800-538-2583
Southwest
Southwest

Form Required, One ESA per passenger, Must be Cat or Dog

Phone: 1-800-435-9792
Spirit
Spirit

Form Required, One ESA per passenger, Must be Cat or Dog

Phone: 1-801-401-2222
United Airlines
United Airlines

Form Required, One ESA Per Passenger, ESA Cannot Weigh more than 65 lbs

Phone: 1-800-864-8331

6 Steps to Flying with your ESA

Complete and Submit all Required Paperwork
02
Complete and Submit all Required Paperwork

Check to see if your airline requires a specific form or letter to travel with your ESA. Some forms require your veterinarian to sign off on your ESA as well as your licensed mental health profesisonal. All forms must be fully completed before submitting, or you risk failure to board or fees

Arrive Early
04
Arrive Early

Set aside time to take your dog out for a long walk before the flight.They will not be able to go to the bathroom on the flight, and you definitely dont want any accidents on board! Many airports do also have animal relief areas, so be sure to take advantage of these if you can. To make sure that your travel is hassle-free, arrive at airport early and inform a security officer that the animal accompanying you is an ESA. It will help you expedite the check-in process and may also give you an opportunity to move to the front of the screening line. Airlines recommend you arrive 2 hours early for domestic flights and 3 hours early for international flights. You may want to give yourself an extra thirty minutes to make sure you are not rushed or stressed with your ESA.

Be considerate of others
06
Be considerate of others

Flying with an ESA can easily turn into an overwhelming and stressful experience. If your dog is easily frightened by loud noises or crowded places, you may want to consider an alternate form of transportation. The loud noises trigger frightened reactions by your dog, so you must exercise judgement in determining your dog’s temperament and ability to handle long flights.

Always be polite and friendly with the security officers, crew members and fellow passengers. There will be an expectation that your dog is properly trained and well behaved. Your dog should not bark or jump up on you, unless that is how it is trained to alert you. If you do not think your dog will be able to stay composed on a flight, you should not bring it.

Additionally, avoid bringing water onto the plane for your Service Dog or Emotional Support Animal as it might cause a mess and inconvenience the people on board. TSA also prohibits bringing fluids through security.. Keep treats readily accessible to help your dogs stay calm during take off. Try to minimize your fluid intake before and during the flight to avoid trips to the bathrooms. They are very small and may not be able to fit you and your dog.

International Flights with
your Emotional Support Animal

It is important to remember that flying with an Emotional Support Animal is protected under American Law. While many counties to recognize travel with emotional support and service animals, not all of them do. Access laws can vary from country to country, so if you are going to be traveling internationally, be sure to speak to your airline directly to determine their exact policy. In most cases they will require a specific letter or form to be completed and submitted prior to flight.